EVERYONE ON GOOGLE

This is part of a project called "Everyone on Google," a cumulative reinterpretation of Douglas Huebler's 1970 Variable Piece #70. Visitors to the Swell Gallery volunteer to have their name (first or full) searched on Google, then are photographed holding a sign with what Google says he or she is. These pictures were taken by the camera inside the laptop used to Google the participants, and were immediately re-published to the Internet.

The project is one of many that comprise the "Living Archives" exhibition at the San Francisco Art Institute:
www.living-archives.com

December 13, 2009 at 9:28pm
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November 20, 2009 at 6:11pm
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Douglas Huebler, 1971:
At various art events, visitors who had agreed to the conditions for participating in this project randomly selected one of eighty cards on which were printed cliches such as ‘AT LEAST ONE PERSON WHO IS BEAUTIFUL BUT DUMB’ (Included in this stack of cards were ‘characterizations’ fabricated by the artist especially for this work.)
By being forbidden to read the card until after being photographed with it, each participant posed with the full knowledge that ‘chance’ would associate his, or her, face with a characterization whose truth could be gratuitously flattering or outrageously insulting.
The subject of each ‘portrait’ produced by this activity had agreed that, whatever the result, it was to become a permanent document of the ‘everyone alive’ project. Anyone who found the instantly produced Polaroid print completely unacceptable was allowed to use a ‘Magic Marker’ to ‘de-face’ it; virtually no one did so.
Jenny Odell (me), 2009:
At the opening of the “Living Archives” exhibit at the SFAI Swell Gallery, visitors who had agreed to the conditions for participating in this project had their (first or full) name Googled by the artist on a laptop at a small table (for example, “Jenny Odell is”, searched in quotes). The participants where able to select an association (“Jenny Odell is a surgical assistant in Buffalo, New York”); the artist wrote this association on a piece of paper that the participant held in a photo taken by the laptop on which they were Googled.
By agreeing to be Googled, each participant posed with the full knowledge that ‘Google’ would associate his, or her, name and face with a characterization whose truth could be gratuitously flattering or outrageously insulting.
The subject of each ‘portrait’ produced by this activity had agreed that, whatever the result, it was to be re-published to the Internet on this ‘Everyone on Google’ Tumblr. Participants were allowed to keep their signs; virtually everyone did so.

Douglas Huebler, 1971:

At various art events, visitors who had agreed to the conditions for participating in this project randomly selected one of eighty cards on which were printed cliches such as ‘AT LEAST ONE PERSON WHO IS BEAUTIFUL BUT DUMB’ (Included in this stack of cards were ‘characterizations’ fabricated by the artist especially for this work.)

By being forbidden to read the card until after being photographed with it, each participant posed with the full knowledge that ‘chance’ would associate his, or her, face with a characterization whose¬†truth could be gratuitously flattering or outrageously insulting.

The subject of each ‘portrait’ produced by this activity had agreed that, whatever the result, it was to become a permanent document of the ‘everyone alive’ project. Anyone who found the instantly produced Polaroid print completely unacceptable was allowed to use a ‘Magic Marker’ to ‘de-face’ it; virtually no one did so.

Jenny Odell (me), 2009:

At the opening of the “Living Archives” exhibit at the SFAI Swell Gallery, visitors who had agreed to the conditions for participating in this project had their (first or full) name Googled by the artist on a laptop at a small table (for example, “Jenny Odell is”, searched in quotes). The participants where able to select an association (“Jenny Odell is a surgical assistant in Buffalo, New York”); the artist wrote this association on a piece of paper that the participant held in a photo taken by the laptop on which they were Googled.

By agreeing to be Googled, each participant posed with the full knowledge that ‘Google’ would associate his, or her, name and face with a characterization whose¬†truth could be gratuitously flattering or outrageously insulting.

The subject of each ‘portrait’ produced by this activity had agreed that, whatever the result, it was to be re-published to the Internet on this ‘Everyone on Google’ Tumblr. Participants were allowed to keep their signs; virtually everyone did so.

5:20pm
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5:19pm
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5:18pm
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5:18pm
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5:18pm
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5:18pm
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5:17pm
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5:17pm
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